Talking Tins

Talking Tins

Red Talking Tin - 40 seconds

 
Rachael from Waipawa Primary uses it to give a ‘problem of the day’. A brain teaser/problem, which is directly related to the Inquiry being worked on at the time, is recorded onto the talking tin and then put onto the magnetic whiteboard in the classroom. The children come into the classroom first thing in the morning and listen to the pre-recorded problem. Originally the activity was devised to promote discussion and encourage oral language co-operatively, but as time went on, it was changed so that it was more of an individual ‘race’ to see who could solve the problem first. When the individual challenge first began, the teacher was focussing on promoting a higher level of thinking, then as children began to orally give possible solutions, the focus moved to a written one, where they would record their possible answers. This resulted in fewer children in the classroom being late (as they all wanted to be the first to get the answer), greater range of vocabulary (as the possible solutions were discussed), greater use of written skills without being called directly ‘writing’ and a high level of participation and motivation.
 
 
Yvonne and Patricia are RTlits based at Hastings Central who have found the talking tins to be of great benefit to individuals as they visit classrooms, particularly for those who have difficulty with oral language and written language. They found that by asking the children to quickly record a piece of incorrect written or oral language and then play it back to them, gave them the time to acknowledge where they may be incorrect. This allowed them to recognise and self-correct their errors, giving them the ‘power’ to succeed.
 
 
Louise Strickland a teacher at Irongate School has found that for those children who may find it difficult to have ideas or remember their ideas during writing, the talking tins are a great help, especially for those children needing a lot of one to one attention. She has the children discuss their ideas with herself, or a teacher aide and then the children record their first idea. They then begin their writing by playing back their recording as many times as necessary. When they have finished one or two short sentences, they read it back into the talking tin so that they can check that what they have written makes sense and includes their original idea. They then record their next idea and repeat the process. The children like to use the talking tins as they can only have one message recorded so there is no time wasted while they search for the appropriate recording.
 
ESOL students at Irongate School make good use of them by listening to a recording of the teacher using features such as intonation and pitch of certain words and small sentences. They also use them on a daily basis to practice their English allowing them to discover for themselves what sounds correct. Short fun activities such as scrambled days of the week and opposites are pre-recorded for the students to complete either individually, in pairs or co-operatively.
 
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